Storing Your Veggies

Vegetable Harvest and Storage is a great reference on how to preserve the quality of a variety of fruits and vegetables commonly grown in this region.  It is published by the University of Missouri Extension.

Seeds of Hope Farm offerings (in alphabetical order) :

Basil:

This well-loved summer herb is a bit tricky to keep fresh.  We suggest keeping your bunch hydrated and refrigerated,  so try containing it in a plastic bag with the cut stems in a cup of water.

Beets:

Separate tops from the roots and store separately in plastic bags in the refrigerator.  The roots can store for a couple months.

Cabbage:

To keep crisp and hydrated keep refrigerated in sealed plastic bags.  Cabbage will store for months.  If you open your bag and find wilted yellow leaves, just strip them away to reveal a fresh cabbage underneath.

Carrots:

Immediately cut green tops down to a half inch and keep roots refrigerated in moist plastic bags, or cut them and keep cold in containers with water and ready for snacking.  Scrub garden grit from roots during preparation.

Chard:

Keep refrigerated in a plastic bag.  To prepare, strip the tender leaves from their stems, then cook the chopped stems a few minutes longer than the greens.

Collards:

Keep refrigerated in a plastic bag.

Eggplant:

For best quality, store it above 45 degrees.  The center column of your refrigerator is typically warmest.  You might keep it there in a plastic bag.  Add a crumpled paper towel to absorb excess moisture.

Garlic:

Keep your cured cloves dry and well-ventilated at room temperature.  They can last up to six months, but not in a cook’s kitchen!

Kale:

Keep refrigerated in a plastic bag.

Okra:

Keep refrigerated in a plastic bag.

Onions:

Cured onions will keep on the kitchen counter for many weeks.  Uncured onions straight from the field require refrigeration.

Peppers, Bell:

Keep refrigerated in plastic bags, or cut and store in containers with water to maximize crispness.

Potatoes:

Keep your potatoes in a dark cool part of the pantry or house.  Exposure to sunlight will turn the skins green.  Storage at room temperature can stimulate sprouting.

Scallions:

Keep refrigerated in a plastic bag and use within a week.

Tomatoes, Slicing:

Store in a cool environment.  55 degrees is ideal.  Do not refrigerate because this turns the flesh mealy.

Tomatoes, Cherry:

These are fine to keep on the kitchen counter so long as they are kept dry and used in a couple days.  To make them last longer store in the refrigerator.

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